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Full text of "Song Ministry for Solo Singing"

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Swinging tit % Sanctuary. 

'• Let the people praise thee, O God, let all tne people praise thee." 



What « the first requisite to Congregational Singing ? 
Let the people provide themselves with hymns and tune-books, at least one 
for every two worshippers. 

What kind of books should be procured ? 

Such books as contain the hymns of your own denomination, or those 
adopted by the congregation. Most of the different Evangelical Churches 
now have their own hymns set to tunes, and published by their respective 
societies. 

How can the people sing who do not read music ? 

Every Church should hold stated singing meetings, for the purpose of re- 
hearsing the tunes for the coming Sabbath, and for the general improvement 
in music ; and the whole congregation, with the choir, should attend these 
meetings. 

How should such meetings be conducted ? 

Let them be opened with prayer by the pastor; closed with the doxology. 
The music should be under the direction of the chorister, who should be 
well paid for his work— Unless he is able and willing to give his tervLes 
free. 



What is the duty of the chorister \ Quartette, or choir ? 

To lead the congregation in the singing of all the hymns which are read or 
announced from the pulpit. 

Should choirs ever monopolise the service of song in our sanctuaries ? 

Never; no more than a few should monopolise the prayers of our Churches. 

Should organ voluntaries be used in our Church services ? 

While the people are taking and vacating their seats a good organ voluntary 
is always acceptable. 

Should interludes be played between the verses while singing the hymns ? 

In some few cases a very short one may serve as a rest ; but in most cases a 
silent pause, or the reading of the following verse, is better, and more im- 
pressive. 

How can a general interest be awakened in our service of praise ? 

By obtaining the best chorister you can, if possible a devoted Christian, 
whose duty it should be not only to have charge of the music in Church and 
Sabbath School, but also to teach and drill the people at the stated singing 
meetings. The pastor can do much to urge the attendance, and make interesting 
the praise meeting, andin ca rying out the above suggestions. 



Singing in fyt Stanimjr Sejwol. 



'* Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings thou hast ordained praise." 

What is the chief object of Sunday-School music ? 

For worship, and to make more impressive and enduring the lessons taught 
In the school. 

Should we ever sing for pastime and amusement in our Sunday Schools ? 

Never ; the Sunday School is no place for music that only serves to amuse 
or to jingle sweetly. 

What kind of songs should be used ? 

Only such as are praiseworthy, full of the gospel, and adapted to the lessen. 



How can we avoid light and meaningless hymns in our Sunday Schools ? 

By discarding them entirely. 

How much time should be devoted to singing in a Sunday-School session of one 
hour? 

Not more than fifteen minutes, which should be at the beginning and close 
of the lesson. 

How can children best be taught new songs ? 

First let the chorister sing one verse alone, after which let him. sing with the 
children alternately, one or two lines at a time, until the tune is committed to 
memory. 



How can our Sunday-School hymns be rendered most impressive ? 

After the tune is learned, and the sentiment of the poetry well understood, let 
the words be sung from the heart as the spirit of the verses demand, sometimes 
loud or soft, fast or slow, always pronouncing the words distinctly. Frequently 
a solo or duet, with full chorus, may be rendered with effect. 



Should there be singing meetings for children, and when ? 

Yes, thirty or forty minutes just before or after the Sunday-School session 
(or perhaps a special service in the afternoon may be more convenient). In 
either case the time can be well and profitably employed teaching the children 
new songs of Jesus, and also rehearsiqg such hymns as are adapted to the next 
lesson. 

Can there be a general rule for the best method of conducting our services of 
song in Church and Sabbath Schools ? 

If Sunday Schools would use more of the solid, substantial hymns and tunes, 
such as are used in Church, and our Churches adopt the Sunday-School mode 
of rendering their music, which is universally congregational, then would our 
Sunday Schools avoid light or meaningless hymns and tunes, and our Churches 
would attract the " lambs of the flock," and old and young would grow up to 
love and praise God together. 



Singing in tjje $.ragtr greeting. 



* Speaking to yourselves in psalms and hymns, and spiritual tonga, singing with grace in your hearts to the Lord." 



How should singing be conducted in prayer and social meetings ? 

After the opening exercises— which usually consist of reading the Scriptures, 
singing, prayer, and singing another hymn announced by the pastor— let the 
tinging assume more of a voluntary anu impromptu character. 

Should the hymns be read by the pastor before singing ? 
Only those in the opening and dosing exercues. 

What kind of hymns and tunes should be sung ? 

Only such as are of a deeply spiritual and prayerful character. 

How often should hymns or verses be sung in our prayer meeting ? 
If the meeting is dull, sing more frequently, but never so often as to give it 
more of a singing than a prayerfut aspect. 

Should any hymns be sung regardless of the prevailing feeling of the moment ? 
Never, unless you feel confident that the singing will bless some soul 




under peculiar circumstances, and who has not publicly expressed bit 
feelings. 

How can we select the right song for the right place ? 

Wait until after the prayer and remarks are made, then instantly announce 
the page of some hymn or verse that is exactly adapted to the sentiment of 
the moment. 

How eon our devotional meetings be made interesting and become better 
attended? 

Good spirited, and spiritual singing wilt always render a prayer meeting 
interesting, attractive, and. above all, profitable. 

Every prayer-room should be well supplied with hymns and tunes of the most 
hallowed and spiritual character; not onlv those that are old and have endeared 
themselves to the hearts of older Christians by their earlier associations, but 
also such as are new and loved by the children of the Sabbath School, oecause 
first sung by them when God put a new song into their mouths. 



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" Now will I sing of my beloved, fairer than 
the children of men, the chiefest among ten 
thousands, Yea. he is altogether lovely." 

"I will sing of the God of my salvation; 
neither is there salvation in any other, for there 
is none other name under heaven given among 
men. whereby we must be saved." 

" Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly 
in all wisdom: teaching and admonishing one 
another in psalms, and hymns, and spiritual 
songs." 




" And they sing the song of Moses, the servant 
of God, and the song of the Lamb." 

"O that men would praise the Lord for his 
goodness, and for his wonderful works to the 
children of men." 

"Praise God with the psaltery and harp; praise 
him with stringed instruments and organs; let 
every thing that has breath praise the Lord." 



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jpratee t&e Horo, out great Creator. 



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(Praise the Lord, our great < 
t. < Let our strains of mu - 

( If by hum-ble faith '... „ . . 

rPraisethe Lord,our great Re-deem -er. Let the vast ere - a - tton stag; 

•.■{Youngand old with rap -ture praise Hun, God. our Fa-ther, Sa ♦ now, King. 

IPraJse the Lord, our great Cre - a - tor, May lie bless us all to - night. 



t Cre - a - tor, Praise His name with cheer • ml voice ; 

-sic praise Hun. While our glow-ing hearts re-joice. Praise Him 

, we seek Him. He will bless our souls to • night. 



for His boundless 



F, In our song let all u-nitej 
£r*. ry thing with breath a -dore Him jO-cean, wave, and stars of light | 




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|ONG EUlNISTRY, ;; 

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A BEAUTIFUL PRESENT FOR THE HOME, 

CONTAINING PORTRAIT AND ALL MR. PHILLIPS' GEM SOLOS, RICHLY ILLUSTRATED, WITH PIANO AND ORGAN 

ACCOMPANIMENT, CONTAINING 75 SONGS. 96 PAGES. 
Can be had or ordered at Booh and Music Stores. 
PlilOHS, CLOTH, GILT, $1-25; PAPER COVERS, 50 CENTS EACH. 7 



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Sto-ry of the a - get past, 



All earth's annals far sor - pas - sing, Sto- ry that shall e - ver last ; 



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No - blest, tru - est, old - est, new - est, sad - dest, glad - desi, That this world has e - ver known 





Christ, the Father's Son eternal 
Once was born a Son of Man ; 

He who never knew beginning, 
Here on earth a life began. 

3- 
Words of truth and deeds of kindness, 

Miracles of grace and might, 
Scatter fragrance all around Him, 

Shine with heaven's most glorious light. 

4* 
In Gethsemane behold Him, 

In the agony of prayer : 
kneeling, pleading, groaning, bleeding, 

Soul and body prostrate there. 



It is finished 1 see His body, 

Laid alone in Joseph's tomb ; 
9 Tis for us He lieth yonder, 

Prince of Life, enwrapped in gloom. 
6. 
But in vain the grave has bound Him, 

Death has barred its gates in vain ; 
See, for us the Saviour rises, 

Lo 1 for us He bursts the chain. 

7- 
Hear we, then, this grand old story, 

And, in listening, learn to love ; 
Flowing through it to the guilty, 
From a pardoning God above. 

Dr. H. Bonar. 
[From " Song Sermons, 11 by permission.] 



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ft cannot too toitf)out fttyee. 

Words and Music by Philip Phillips. 



" WITHOUT MX VI CAM DO NOTHING." 



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x. I can-notdowith-outThee,Any moment of my life; 






I can - not do without Thee,Passing thro* this world of strife. 

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2 I cannot do without Thee, 
Any moment at my side ; 
I cannot do without Thee, 
Sweetly, Lord, with me abide. — Chorus* 



3 I cannot do without Thee, 
Any moment of my way ; 
I cannot do without Thee, 
Lead me on to perfect day.— Chorus, 



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M SINOINO AND MAKINO MELODY IN YOU* HBART TO THB LOBD." 

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z.I will sing for Je - sus, With His blood He bought me; And all a -long my pilgrim way His lov-ing hand has brought me. 






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a Can there overtake me, 
Any sad disaster, 
While I sing for Jesus, 
My blessed, blessed Master ? 
Oh, help me sing, &c. 



3 I will sing for Jesus ! 

His name alone prevailing, 
Shall be my sweetest music, 
When heart and flesh are failing. 
Oh. help me sing, &c. 




Still I'll sing for Jesus 1 
Oh, how will I adore Him, 

Among the cloud of witnesses, 
Who cast their crowns before Him. 
Oh, help me sing, &c. 



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SONG OF SALVATION— concluded. 




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I have heard how He suffer'd and bled, 
How He languished and died on the tree; 

But then, is it anywhere said 
That He langulsh'd and suffer'd for me ? 



I've been told of a heaven on high, 
Which the children of Jesus shall see; 

But is there a place in the sky, 
Made ready and furnish'd lor me ? 




Lord, answer these questions of mine ; 

To whom shall I go but to Thee ? 
And say by Thy Spirit divine, 

There's a Saviour and heaven for me I 
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Let na try to make fife pleasant 

While the days go swiftly past ; 
And our genial hearts overflowing, 

Make them happy while they last. 
Let our words 01 Christian kindness 

Like the summer dew-drops fall ; 
Give our hands to works of mercy, 

And our loving hearts to all ! 

Chorus. 



Let us try to make life pleasant 

Through the weeks and months that glide, 
Like an eagle on its pinions, 

Or a vessel o'er the tide. 
Though the harp-strings may be silent, 

We can wake its gentle strain ; 
Though its tones may be discordant, 

We can make them sweet again I 

Chorus* 






With simplicity, 

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Let us try to make life pleasant 

While the years roll on apace; 
Every worker for the Master, 

Has a welcome and a place. 
Let us try to make life pleasant, 

And be loving, warm and true ; 
Make the world around us better 

For the good that we can do. 

Chorus. 



THE GUIDING HAND. 

"CAST THT BVKDM Oil THB LORD." 

. __ Response. 



t. It this the way, my Fa-ther? Tb, my child; 1 

a. But en - • - miea are round. Tea, child, I know 1 

3. My Fa-ther, it ie dark. Child, take my band; I 



Philip Phillips. 



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Thou must paw through thia tangled, dreary wild. If thou would*et reach the 
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Cling done to me, 111 lead thee through the land; Trust my aU-eeeing care, 



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My footsteps seem to slide. 
Response— Child, only raise 
Thine eyes to me, then in these slippery ways 
I will hold up thy goings; 
And thou shalt praise 
Me for each step above, 
Me for each step above. 



O Father, I am weary I 
Response — Child, lean thine head 
Upon my breast ; k was my love that spread 
Thy rugged path ; hope on, 
Till I have said- 
Rest, test, for ever rest ; 
Rest, rest, for ever resu 

Mrs. Smith. 



N.B. — The response and chant would be effective if sung as an echo, or from another room or gallery, just so as to be distinctly heard, 

17 




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SCATTER SEEDS OP KINDNESS— concluded. 



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Strange, we never prize the music 

Till the sweet- voiced bird has flown 1 
Strange, that we should slight the violets 

Till the lovely flowers are gone I 
Strange, that summer skies and sunshine 

Never seem one-half so fair, 
As when winter's snowy pinions 

Shake the white down in the air. 
Chorus. 



If we knew the baby fingers, 

Pressed against the window pane. 
Would be cold and stiff to-morrow— 

Never trouble us again— 
Would the bright eyes of our darling 

Catch the frown upon our brow ? 
Would the print of rosy fingers 

Vex us then as they do now? 
Chorus. 



Ah 1 those little ice-cold fingers, 

How they point our memories back 
To the hasty words and actions 

Strewn along our backward track ! 
How those little hands remind us, 

As in snowy grace they he, 
Not to scatter thorns— but i 

For our reaping by-and-by I 
Chorus. 



USEFULNESS IS THE HIGHEST TYPE OF CHRISTIANITY, 
AND LITTLE DEEDS AND WORDS OF KINDNESS ARE 
THE STRONGEST WEAPONS OF USEFULNESS. 



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Arrmmgtdfrm* "SINGING ANNUAL AND SONG LIFE," by permission* 



19 





I. Come, strike the high - est 



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THE LOFTIEST NOTE OF PRAISE- concluded. 





He gave His life 



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Come, strike the highest note again, 

'Tis Jens, Jesus still r 
No other name with such delight 

The longing heart can fill. 
Yes, I will glory in His cross, 

And there by faith I'll cling, 
When I forget His wondrous love, 

Then let me cease to sing. 



That highest note, my Saviour dear, 

I'll strike with every breath ; 
I'll shout the triumphs of His grace 

Along the vale of death. 
Then in that glorious land of song, 

When crowns of joy are given, 
I'll sing in tender, sweeter strains, 

That highest note in heaven* 



KEEP ME TOOM SINKING DOWN. 



* OUT 07 TUB ] 



I RAVI I OBIXD UBTO THES, O LORD. 9 



Arranged by Philip Phillips, from Friedman's Melodf, 



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O.... Lord,., my Lord 

O.... Lord,., my Lord 

O.... Lord,., my Lord 

O.... Lord,., my Lord 



O.... my good Lord, 

O.... my good Lord, 

O.... my good Lord, 

O.... my good Lord, 



Keep me from sink - ing down. When 

Keep me from sink - ing down. When 

Keep me from sink - ing down. All 

Keep me from sink - ing down. And 



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foes oppress on ev-ery hand, Keep me from sinking down ; While wand'rinff thro' this weary land. Keep me from sinking down. 
8a - tan hurls his fie-ry darts, Keep me from sinking down ; Oh, nev-er let thy help depart, Keep me from sinking down, 
thro* my life be thou my stay, Keep me from sinking down ; Remove my sins far, mr a - way, Keep me from sinking down, 
when the strife with me is o'er, Keep me from sinking down ; Oh, land me safe on Canaan's shore, Keep me from sinking down. 



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Art thou oppressed, and poor, and heavy-hearted, 
The heavens above thee in thick clouds arrayed, 

And well-nigh crushed, no earthly strength imparted, 
No friendly voice to say " Be not afraid ? " 

God knows it all I 

3* 

Art thou a mourner, are thy tear-drops flowing 
For one so early lost to earth and thee— 

The depth of grief, no human spirit knowing, 
Which mourns in secret, like the moaning sea ? 

God knows it all I 



— sa 



Dost thou look back upon a life of sinning ? 

Forward, and tremble for thy future lot ; 
There's One who sees the end from the beginning ; 

The penitential tear is unforgot. 

God knows it all I 

Then go to God, put out your heart before Him ; 

There is no grief your Father cannot feel ; 
And let your grateful songs of praise adore Him ; 

To save, forgive, and every wound to heal. 

God knows it all I 



M35 




move a - mid the mul - ti-tude, The hap - piest of the throng. 



The wine St spark - ling 




Most beau - ti-fal 



They say it glit - ten to de-cehre, But 



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SELF-DECEIVED— continued. 

"LOOK HOT THOU UPON TBB WIM1 WHRM IT It RID.* * tTROMQ DUMI SHALL 




First Degree. 

If Y heart is light and free ; 

My step is firm and strong; 
I move amid the multitude, 

The happiest of the throng. 
The wine is sparkling red, 

Most beautiful to see ; 
They say it glitters to deceive, 

But what is that to me ? 
Oh, I am safe I am safe ! no danger can I see; 
The wine will ruin you, perhaps, but cannot injure me. 



"no aor dumk stroro drink, thou nor thy sons with thar." 





Second Degree. 

I'm older than I was, 

I'm wiser now, to* day, 
Than when last year I danced and sang— 

The happiest of the gay ; 
My limbs are slightly weak, 

I tremble some, you see, 
And brandy need to calm my nerves, 

But what is that to me ? 
Oh, I am safe 1 am safe I no danger can I see ; 
The brandy '11 ruin you, perhaps, but cannot injure me* 

24 




Third Degree. 
Carnival joys I prize, 

To drive dull care away ; 
And often quit life's busy round 

To cheer the long dull day. 
My brain is over-taxed 

With grave perplexity, 
A glass of whisky builds me up, 
But what is that to me ? 
Oh, I am safe 1 am safe ! no danger can I see ; 
The whisky '11 ruin you, perhaps, but cannot injure i 



•iff BITSTH UEB A SKRPBMT AND STIHOBTH UO AM ADDER.' 




Fourth Degree. 

Ah, nothing harms me now, 

All liquors tempt my thirst- 
Old ale, and gin, and rum alike 

Are good as wine at first ; 
For drinking schools a man, 

Sets him from bondage free; 
I'm not fastidious in my taste, 

But what is that to me ? 
Oh, I am safe 1 am safe I no dangei 



Strong drink will ruin you, perhaps, but cannot injure me. 



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SELF-DECEIVED— concluded. 



-tarn drunrard 



OLUTTON SHALL COMB TO FOVSRTT." 




"■OR DRUNRARDS NOR BZTORTIOMBRS tHALL INHERIT Til RINODOM OF OOD.' 




Fifth Degree. 
When I am asked to drink 

I never answer, No ; 
I cannot purchase it myself 

I daily poorer grow. 
My living all is gone, 

My clothes in rags yon see ; 
I take whatever I can beg. 
But what is that to me ? 
Oh, I am safe I am safe I no danger can I see ; 
The rags might frighten yon, perhaps, but cannot frighten 1 




Sixth Degree. 
I'm safe ! But am I safe ? 
Oh ! what is that I see 1 
A yawning gulf before me lies, 

A drunkard's grave for me. 
For me I for me I Oh, save 1 

Brave comrades, hear my call I 
8tretch out a hand to rescue me ; 
I tremble ! shiver 1 fall I 
Not one, alas, is safe I but all who take the glass, 
And drink the brandy, rum, and gin, shall feel its sting at last. 



-^j, Slow. 



BLESS HE NOW. 

BLBSUNO OF TBB LORD IT MARBTH RICS." 



J J I eJ" 



Philip Phillips. 



At the cross of Christ I bow; Take my guilt and 
Lift the clouds, the fct - ten break; While I look, and 



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i. Heaven - ly Fa - ther, bless me now, At the cross of 
2. Now, just now, for Je • sus' sake, Lift the clouds, the 

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Christ I bow; Take my 
fct . ters break; While I 

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nef a - way; Hear and heal me now, I pray. Now, O Lord, this ve - ry hour, 
as I cry, Touch and cleanse me, ere I die. Nev - er did. I so a • dote 

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grace, and show Thy power; While I rest up - on Thy word, Come and bless me now, O Lord. 

Christ, Thy Son, be - fore: Now the time, and this the place, Gra-cious Fa- ther, show Thy grace. 

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Light and life art Thou within— 
Saviour, Thou from every 

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Mercv now, O Lord, I plead, 
In this hour of utter need ; 



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Turn me not away unblest, 
Calm my anguish into rest. 



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O Thou loving, blessed One, 
Rising o'er me like the sun, 



Rev. Dr. Alex. Clarx. 



25 



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Its ban - ner true we raise, 



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Let 
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rules the world in righ - teous - ness, Be - fore Him an - gels fall, 



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our coun • try save Bv Thy great might. 




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OUR NATIVE LAND— tmduded. 



Old Hundredth. Chorus to Second Vera. 



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shall reign where - e er the 



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UUT STXBT THDT0 THAT HATH BBBATH PBAISB TO* LO*D.» 



Philip Phillips. 




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1. Yes, let onr con - gre - ga - tions sing, And let our earth - ly temples ring With hymns of joy from er - ery sonl, 
2.0 rapturous mu - sic, how sub - lime 1 I wept, and thought the olden time Of Watt's and Wes - ley's ear-nest throng, 



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In cy - ery church from pole to pole, Let all u - nit - ed join, and raise This old fa-mil-iar song of praise. 
Had with its flame in - spired the song ; Oh, let us sing with one ao - cord, Join heart and voiee to praise the Lord : 

Chorus to second verse. Sing JL M. Doxology. 



Firm. 



Chorus to first verso. 



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Oh for a thousand tongues, to sing My great Be-deem-er's praise; The glo-ries of my God and 

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39 



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a. 3- 

Shall I be missed if another succeed me, Only the truth that in life I have spoken, Oh, when the Saviour shall make up his jewels, 

Reaping the fields I in spring-time have sown ? Only the seed that on earth I have sown ; When the bright crowns of rejoicing are won, 

No, for the sower may pass from his labour, These shall pass onward when I am forgotten, Then will his faithful and weary disciples 

Only remembered by what he has done. Fruits of the harvest and what I have done. All be remembered for what they have done. 




2 WHEN WE DIB, OUR DOINGS WILL FOLLOW, AND THOSB WHO KNEW 

1 AND SURVIVE US WILL REMEMBER WHAT WB DID. 



Ngyy<»ggw»;Yp»gYp«»gyg«wgw»»nry^ 



28 



Arrttnftdfrom "SINGING ANNUAL AND SONG LIFE? by permission. 



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A LEAP FOR LIFE— continued. 




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There stood the boy whhdiz - sy brain, Between the sea and iky. 
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No fret declining ran, no wining moon; 
But then the Lamb than yield perpetual light 
*M W peetoree green end water* ever blight 



No night ehefl be in heeTen, no darkened room, 
No bed of death nor ellenoe of the tomb ; 
Bat breexee erer freeh with lore end truth 
Shall brace the frame with en Immortal youth. 



No night ehefl be In heaven ; oh, had I fcHa 
To rest in what the faithful Wltneee eelth, 
That faith ehefl make theee hideoue phentoma flee. 
And leeve no night henceforth on earth to me. 



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fore* . p Nearer my home, Nearer my home, Near-er my home to - day, to -day,Than I have been be - lore. ♦ . 



Chorus. 



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Nearer my Father's house, 
Where many mansions be ; 

Nearer the great white throne to-day, 
Nearer the crystal sea. 

Chorus. — Nearer my home, &c 




Nearer the bound of life, Be near me when my feet 

Where burdens are laid down ; Are slipping o'er the brink ; 

Nearer to leave the cross to-day, For I am nearer nome to-day, 

And nearer to the crown. Perhaps, than now I think. 

Chorus. — Nearer my home, &c. Chorus. — Nearer my home, Ac. 

Miss Phosbb Carey. 
[From " Hallowed Songs " and " Song Life," by permission."] 




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Philip Phillips. 



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1 gave my life for thee, My pre - eious blood i shed, That thou might's* ran - som'd be, An4 

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quick - etiM, quick - en'd ftom ihe dead. 1 gave my life for thee, for thee ; What hast thou giv'n for 



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Hr Father's house of light. 

My rainbow-cirded throae, 
I left Tor cart hi y night, 

For wandering* sad and tone, 
I left it .ill far thee, for thee ; 
Hut thou left au £ ht for Me, (or Me ! 



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t spent Jong yean for thee, 

fn weariness and woe. 
That one ciemity 

Of joy, of joy thou imghtest know. 
t ipcftt long years for thee, for thee ; 
Hast thou *peni on* for Me, for MeT 



And I have brought to thee, 
Down from my house above. 

Salvation full and free. 
My pardon and my Jove- 

Great gifts I brought to thee, to th« ; 

What bast tbou owitghi to Me, to Me f 



I rufTcrcd much for thee, 
More than thy tongue can tell, 

Of btticre*t agony, 
To rescue thee from helL 

I Buffered much for thee, for thee ; 

What dost thou tear for Me, for Mef 

6. 
Oh, let thy life be given, 

Thy years For Me bo spent. 
World fetters all be riven, 

And joy with suffering blent. 
Give ihou tkjmjfto Me T to Me, 
And t will welcome thee, j*\r, thee ? 



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gar-mema to shine Which dia - tin- guish Thy peo-ple be - low. I want eve - ry moment to feel That Thy 





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Fpi- rit re-sides in oiy heart. That His pow-er is pre-sent to cleanse and to heal t And newness of )ife to im - part. 



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I want— oh ! I want to attain 
Some likeness, my Saviour, to Thee, 
That longed-for resemblance once more to regain— 
Thy comelinese put upon mel 
I want to be marked for Thine own. 
Thy seal on my forehead to wear; 
To receive that " new name" on the mystic white stone, 
Which none bnt Thyself can declare. 




86 



93 



I want so in Thee to abide, 
As to bring forth tome fruit to Thy praise 
The branch which Thou prunest, though feeble 1 
May languish, but never decays. 
I want Thine own hand to unbind 
Each tie to terrestrial things— 
Too tenderly cherished, too closely entwined, 
Where my heart too tenaciously clings. 



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I wsnt. ss a traveller, to haste 
Straight onward, nor pause on my way; 
and dried, Nor forethought nor anxious contrivance to waste 
On the tent only pitched for s day. 
I want — and this sums up my prayer— 
To glorify Thee till I die ; 
Then calmly to yield up my soul to Thy care, 
And breathe out, in faith, my last sigh I 

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H POfi WE filAK A CI TV WHICH HATH FOUHDATIOK ." 






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2, I was 

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wea - ry of the load, Ve - ly wea - ry of the load, As I tot - ter'd o'er the road ; But the 




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left the way of sin That I had long wander" d in, And I'm press- ing t'ward the land, 
sin that 1 had done ; My own hand had laid it on Ere I start - ed for the land, 
Sa -viour took the pack From the lit - tie nil -grinds back, And I'm tra-v'llingon with lightsome heart to glo- ry. 



h ini; t'ward the land, the 
start - ea for the land, the land of glo - ry* . 



land of glo 




left the way of 



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sin That I long have wan- der'd in, And I'm travlling to 



the land, the land of 



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[From " Song Life," by permission.] 

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ough wea - ry, Thou dost con -de - scend To be * * • my rest, To be my rest. 



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Leaning on Thee, my soul retires 

From earthly thoughts and earthly thinga ; 
On Thee concentrates her desires, 
To Thee she clings. 

3- 
Leaning on Thee, with childlike faith, 

To Thee the future I confide ; 

Each step of life's untrodden path 

Thy love shall guide. 




Leaning on Thee, though faint and weak, 

Too weak another voice to hear, 
Thy heavenly accents comfort speak— 
"Be of good cheer." 

5- 
Leaning on Thee, no fears alarm, 

Calmly I stand on death's dark brink; 
I feel the everlasting arm, 
I cannot sink f 



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i. Late, late, so late! and dark the night, and chill! Late, late, so late! But we can en - ter still. 
No light had we ; for that we do re - pent. And, learn - ing this, The Bride -groom will re - lent. 



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Have we not heard the Bride-groom is so sweet? Oh, let us in, that we may kiss His feet! 










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to kiss His feet! 



Oh, let us in, though late 




Then shall the kingdom of heaven be likened 
unto ten virgins, which took their lamps, and 
went forth to meet the bridgroom. 

2. And five of them were wise, and five were 
foolish. * 

3. They that were foolish took their lamps, 
and took no oil with them : 

4. But the wise took oil in their vessels with 
their lamps. 

5. While the bridegroom tarried, they all 
slumbered and slept. 



6. And at midnight there was a cry made, 
Behold, the bridegroom cometh j go ye out to 
meet him. 

7. Then all those virgins arose, and trimmed 
their lamps. 

8. And the foolish said unto the wise, Give 
us of your oil ; for our lamps are gone out 

9. But the wise answered, saying, Not so ; 
lest there be not enough for us and you : but go 
ye rather to them that sell, and buy for your- 
selves. 



hey we 

they I 



groom came ; and they that were ready went 
in with him to the marriage : and the door was 
shut. 

11. Afterward came also the other virgins, 
saying, Lord, Lord, open to us. 

12. But he answered and said, Verily I say 
unto you, I know you not. 

13. Watch therefore, for ye know neither the 
day nor the hour wherein the Son of man cometh. 

Matthew xxv. I -13. 




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There is a gate that stands a - jar, And through its por - tals gleam - ing^ A ra - diancc from the 






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Cross a - far The Sa ■ viour's love re - veal - - ing. Oh, depths of mcr - cy* can ii be, That 



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For me? for me?., 



Was left a - jar for me? 




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That j*ate ajar stands free for all 
Who seek through it salvation ; 

The rich and poor, the preai and small, 
Of every tribe and nation. 

Refrain — Oh, depths, &c* 



Press onward, then, though fo«a may frown.. 

While mercy's trnte is open, 
Accept the Cross, and win th* Crown, 

Love's everlasting; token. 

RtpjiAiN— Oh, depths, &c 



Beyond the river's brink well lay 
The Cross that here is given, 

And bear the crown of life away, 
And [me Him nmre in hcavi n. 
HtntAis- — Oh, depths, frc 

40 ArmnpdMnt " SONG LIFE ,( AND "SINGING A NNVAI." 



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Far from home, yes, far from homer In sin and rags I 



sad - ly roam; No ten - der love or 



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Far from home and Ear from God, 
1 feci the chastening of His rod, 
In feeding here amonff the swine, 
Refusing pea a" and love divine* 
Come home, &c 



Far from home and (ar from Christ, 
His love so free and without price; 
While here in wretchedness 1 roam, 
Far from God, and Christ, and home* 
Come heme, dec. 



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Quick to the banquet house repair. 
Thy Father stands to greet thee there; 
Come, now, behold I lis smiling face, 
He'll kiss thee with His pardoning grace. 
Come home, &c 



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Oar birds of song are silent now, 
There are no flowers blooming, 

But life beats in the frozen bough, 
And freedom's spring is coming; 

And freedom's tide comes up always, 
Though we may stand in sorrow, 

And our good bark aground to-day, 

|: Shall float again to-morrow. :| 



Tho* hearts brood o'er the past, our eyes 
With smiling futures glisten ; 

Lol now the dawn bursts up the skies, 
Lean out your souls and listen. 

The world rolls freedom's radiant way, 
And ripens with our sorrow, 

And 'tis the martyrdom to-day, 

|: Brings victory to-morrow. :Q 



Tho' all the long dark night of years,' 
The people's cry ascended, 

And earth was wet with blood and tears. 
Ere their meek sufferance ended; 

The few shall not for ever sway, 
The many toil in sorrow, 

The bars of hell are strong to-day, 

|; But Christ shall rise to-morrow. :D 



O youth flame earnest soil inspire, 

With energies immortal, 
To many a haven of desire, 

Your yearning opes the portal ; 
And though age wearies by the way. 

And hearts break in the farrow, 
Well sow the golden grain to-day, 
H: The harvest comes to-morrow. :fl 



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GUARD THY TONGUE^cofttiftrai. 




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Set a watch, O Lord, be - fore my mouth, And keep Thou the . • 

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door of my lips." 
ritard. 







It can cheer the sad and lonely, 

Like a beam of morning light ; 
O'er a gentle, loving spirit, 

It can throw a cruel blight • 
We have need to guard it wisely, 

And be careful what we say, 
Lest we harm an erring brother, 

Who may stumble by the way. 

Set a watch, &c 



With the tongue we blend our voices 

In the melody of song ; 
With the tongue we utter falsely, 

And we do each other wrong. 
Can a single fountain give us 

Sweet and bitter waters too ? 
Yes ! the tongue speaks good and evil, 

Though it ought not so to do. 

Set a watch, &c 



How a spark of angry feeling 

It will kindle to a flame 
We can chain the savage lion, 

But the tongue can no man tame. 
With the tongue we bless our Father, 

With the tongue His law profane 
W>th the tongue we praise our Maker, 

And we take His Name in vain. 
Coda. For of every kind of beast, &c 



Coda, to last 




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GUARD THY TONGUE— concluded. 



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THE TONGUE. 

(Tune— " Guard The Tomoue.") 
The following four beautiful Vines were written for Mr. Philip Phillips, by Miss Mary B. Leslie, of Calcutta. 



Hush that idle whisper, brother; 

Think the Lord is standing near, 
Listening to each word thou speakctt 

Of the souls to Him so dear I 
Tell how firmly walks thy brother ; 

All his brave and true deeds tell; 
Speak not of the past's dark errors, 

Tell not that he tripped and fell. 
Set a watch, O Lord, &c. 



Sister, heed what words thou nearest ; 

Think the Lord is standing near, 
Listening to each light word uttered 

Of the souls to Him so dear ! 
Speak not, hear not, what the Master 

Would not have thee hear or say ; 
Tender is His tearful silence, 

When His loved ones go astray. 

Set a watch, O Lord, &c. 



If sin should overtake thy brother, 

Think the Lord is standing near; 
Tell Him all, but tell no other, 

For that soul to Him is dear. 
Then go to thy wandering brother, 

Speak with tears heard in thy voice ; 
Thou wilt win him, and the Master 

Will, with thee, o'er him rejoice. 

Set a watch, O Lord, &c 



Loving Master, Holy Jesus, 

Thou art ever standing near; 
Fill us from Thy love's deep fulness, 

Love to all, to Thee so dear. 
Give us kind and tender feeling, 

Loving patience, ever new, 
Oneness with Thyself, O Master, 

Make us to each other true. 

Coda and Chorus. 





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Cold and bleak the winds were blowing, Paint - ly toll d the midnight bell ; Sad - ly moan'd a wretche 




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Thought had neiVd his soul to mad-ness, Hear the clanking of his chain. He would rend its links a - sun -der, But the 



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egle is in vain. Helpless vie- dm, Helpless vic-tira, Crime had forg'd that heavy chain, 








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THE PARDON— continued. 




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Home, he starts with fear and trem • bles, Hides his face with guilt and shame; 

Moth erl hush, he dare not breathe it, Dare not speak that nal • lowed 

Light and staccato. 



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Let his an-guish, Let his an-guish One bright tear of pi - ty claim. | the bar of fJ U8 ~tice, 

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One brief mo-mcnt, All is read-y 



To the scaf- fold he is led. They have drawn it, they have drawn it, 
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Drawn the black cap o'er his head. M Lo ose the prisoner ! " All is 



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Thus in mer - cy, thus in mer- cy, God the sin - ner deigns to spare, When a - gainst His laws re - bel - ling, 
Mer - cy plead-ing, mer- cy pleading, Shines a sun- beam o'er the gloom ; Lore, e - ter - nal love en - folds him. 
Largo, 






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Jus - tice seals his fear - ful doom ; Shuts from him the light of glo - ry ; Brings him al - most to the tomb. 
Je - SU8 brings a sweet re-prieve, Pre- cious pax-don, free and bound-less, All who wish it may re- ccive. 



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pi] - grim farthers anchored on New England's rock-y shore; 
stood, a mighty na-tion^and re - -nounccd Bri-tannia's sway; Yet they had no railroad station, and they 



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4 Lo I cur commerce wide extending, wb can traffic where we will, 
And our country'* starry banner, see it waving pTrrtidly still : 
And our steamships oVr the ocean bring us all otir heart's desire, 
And we talk with foreign monarch s by the telegfaphk wire- 
While from China and Hindoos tan we have workmen to employ, 
We ci tend the hand of kindness, and we welcome them with joy ; 
We will tell them of the Bible, by its pure and precious word, 
We will teach them how to Labour in the vineyard of the Lord, 

50 



3 To our conntry 's early history now welt turn nor eyes again. 
When the people sang together in a quiet, simple strain. 
In a church of humble structure, on a sloping hill that stood, 
With a grave-yard close beside it, overshadowed by a wood : 
Though the seed was sown in weaJmess, yet its great results we share, 
For the blessings which surround us is in answer to their prayer. 
Now with all these vast improvements, and our banner wide unfurled, 
With a real that never falters let iu Christian: if the world. 





11 Because Thy loving- kindness is better 
than life, my lips shall praise Thee." 

11 1 wilt stng: unto the Lord, because He 
bath dealt bountifully with me," 

■■ I will declare Thy name unto my breth- 
ren - in the midst of the congregation will I 
praise Thee,* 1 

11 The Lord is my strength and my song." 



: 



•• I will praise Thee, O Lord, among the 
people, I will sing unto Thee among the 
nations. For Thy mercy is great unto the 
heavens, and Thy truth unto the clouds," 

•• O magnify the Lord with me, and let us 
exalt His name together." 



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Your lofty themes, ye mortals bring i 
In songs of praise divinely sing ; 
The great salvation loud proclaim, 
And shout for joy the Saviour's name. 



PRAYER 



Id every land begin the song; 
To every land the strains belong ; 
In cheerful sounds all voices raise. 
And fill the world with loudest praise. 





Singing for Je - sus, singing for Je - sus, Trying to genre Him wherever I go ; 



Pointing the lost to the way of sal - 




va -tion — This be my mis - sion, a pilgrim be -low. When in the strains of my country I min - gle, When to ex • alt her my voice I would 





Singing for Jesus glad hymns of devotion, 

Lifting the soul on her pinions of love ; 
Dropping a word or a thought by the wayside, 

Telling of rest in the mansions above. 
Music may soften where language would fail us, 

Feelings long buried 'twill often restore, 
Tones that were breathed from the lips of departed, 

How we revere them when they are no more. 



Singing for Jesus, my blessed Redeemer, 

God of the pilgrims, for Thee I will sing ; 
When o'er the billows of time I am wafted, 

Still with Thy praise shall eternity ring. 
Glory to God for the prospect before me, 

Soon shall my spirit transported ascend ; 
Singing for Jesus, O blissful employment, 

Loud hallelujahs that never will end 1 



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52 Arranged Jrom "AMERICAN SACRED SONGSTER AND SINGING PILGRIM," by permission 





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us though our steps are slow, Though 



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oft we feint and fal - ter by the way, Though storms and dark - ness oft obscure the day. But when the clouds are gone. We 




He leads us on through all the trying years, 
Past all our dreamland hopes, and doubts, and (ears ; 
He guides our steps through all the tangled maze, 
In paths of peace and wisdom's pleasant ways. 
Refrain — But when, &c 



And He, at last, after the weary strife, 
Will lead us home to everlasting life ; 
No parting there, or pain, on that bright shore; 
We'll meet dear friends, and sing for evermore. 
Rbprain — But when, &c 



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A rrangtd from " SONG SERMONS n and* ST A NDA RD SINGER," by 



53 



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" I'm sweeping through the gate, washed in the blood of the 
Lamb." — Dying wards of Rev. Alfred Cookman. 



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Philip Phillips. 




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I. I am now a child of God, 



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watch- ing, and I'm long - ing while I wait. 



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I AM SWEEPING THROUGH THE GATES— included. 



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home be-yond the sky, To my wel-come as I'm sweep -ing thro' the gates. 



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Oh ! the blessed Lord of light, 

I have lov*d Him with my might ; 
Now His arms enfold, and comfort while I wait; 

I am leaning on His breast, 

Oh ! the sweetness of His rest, 
And I'm thinking of my sweeping through the gate. 



I am sweeping towards the gate, 
Where the blessed for me wait ; 

Where the weary workers rest for evermore. 
Where the strife of earth is done, 
And the crown of life is won, 

Oh! I'm thinking of the city while I soar. 




Burst are all the prison bars, 

And I soar beyond the stars : 
To my Father's house, the bright and blest estate. 

Lo 1 the morn eternal breaks, 

And the song immortal wakes, 
Rob'd in whiteness, I'm sweeping through the gates.— Rkv. John Paikxk. 



Arrmmgrffrem "SONG LIFE; 9 by /*rmistum. 



55 



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It may not be my way, It may not be 



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My way ; And yet in his own way, M The Lord will pro - vide." Then, we'll trust in the Lord, And 



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At some time or other the Lord will provide ; 
It may not be my time, 
It may not be thy time ; 
And yet in His ovon time, 
u The Lord will provide." 



Despond then, no longer, the Lord will provide; 
And this be the token — 
No word He hath spoken 
Was ever yet broken — 
"The Lord will provide." 




March on, then, right boldly, the sea shall divide; 
The pathway made glorious, 
With shoutings victorious, 
We'll join in the chorus, 
"The Lord will provide." 



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56 



Arranged from "SINGING ANNUAL," by permiss ion. 



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m not be with you long, mother, I soon must say Good - bye; But, mo-ther, we shall 



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meet a - gain In God's bright home on 



high; O mo-ther, don't you know you said Sweet 



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Shell know me when I come, mother. 

She'll take me by the hand \ 
We'll always be together there, 

In yonder peaceful land. 
And, Mother, we shall wear bright crowns, 

We'll be with Jesus too *, 
And then, before God's golden throiw 

We'll stand and wait for you. 



I like to feel your hand, mother, 

So soft upon my brow ; 
I always loved its gentle touch, 

Tis dearer to me now. 
O mother, do not weep for me, 

I'm not afraid to die \ 
Your lip is trembling, and I see 

The tears are in your eye* 



Lean closer down your ear, mother. 

My voice is growing weak ; 
You're weeping yet, 1 felt a tear 

Just fall upon my check. 
My eyes grow dim, and, oh 1 I hear 

Sweet music from the sky ; 
It is for me f Tm going now— 

Mother, dear mother, Good-bye 1 



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the skies. 



Chorus to First Verse. — " Oh, help me sing for Jesus." — (Phillips.) 



In social circles, when we meet 
Around the Christian's mercy-seat, 
Oh, then, with feelings deep and strong, 
We join as one the choral song : — 



From happy children, when they meet 
In Sabbath school, their dear retreat, 
May congregations learn to raise, 
In tones Tike these their grateful praise. 



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Oh, help me sing for Je - sus, Help me tell the sto - ry Of Him who did re -deem us, The Lord of life and glo - ry. 

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Chorus to Second Verse. — " Sweet hour of prayer." — (Bradbury.) 

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1 1 2nd time. 



Sweet hour of pray*r ! sweet hour of prayV ! That calls me from a world of care ; 



And bids me 



my 



fa - ther*s throne Make all my wants and 



wish - es known. 



Chorus to Third Verse. — " Yes, we'll gather at the river." — (Lowry.) 



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Ga - ther with the saints 



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the throne 



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58 Arranged fr»m" SINGING ANNUAL? by ftrmiuumA 

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snow she press'd, The babe was sleep - ing on her breast, The babe was sleep - ing on her breast. 

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And colder still the winds did blow. 

And darker hours of night came on. 
And deeper grew the drifted snow, 
Her limbs were chill'd, her strength was 
O God ! she cried, in accents wild, 
If I must perish, save my child. 
If I must perish, save my child. 

3- 
She stripped the mantle from her breast, 

And bared her bosom to the storm, 

As round the child she wrapped the vest, 

She smiled to think that it was warm. 

With one cold kiss, a tear of grief, 

The broken-hearted found relief. 

The broken-hearted found relief. 




At morn her cruel husband passed. 

And saw her on her snowy bed. 
Her tearful eyes were closed at last, 
Her cheek was pale, her spirit fled. 
He raised the mantle from the child, 
The babe looked up and sweetly smiled, 
The babe looked up and sweetly smiled. 

5- 

Shall this sad warning plead in Tain T 

Poor thoughtless one, it tpeaks toy*; 

Now break the tempter's cruel chain, 

No more your dreadful way pursue : 

Renounce the cup, to Jesus fig— 

Immortal soul, why will you die? 

Immortal soul, why will you dief 



Arranged from ' 



GOSPEL TE MPERANCE SONGS," fy permission. 



igitized By 



69 




r - 




1. A ship was on the migh-ty deep, With all her sails un -far I'd, Tho* scarce a breath, that calm still morn, The crest-ed bil-low 

2. Her deck was throng'd with precious souls, The young and old were there, And some with fur- row'd brows that woke Full many a trace of 

3. All drank the cup that Pleasure held, But gave no thought to Him, Their heav'n-ly guide, whose bounteous hand Had filFd it to the 




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curi'd, For many an hour up - on the wave, That state- ly ves- sel lay, Then spread her can - vas to the breeze, And proudly sail'd a - way. 
care. Theyglid-ed on, — a week had pass'd, The sky was still se-rene ; As if a storm could ne-ver change The beau-ty of the scene, 
brim. But see far off, where yon- der sun Is fad-ing to his rest ; That bank of clouds por-tejvtous rise A -cross the golden west! 



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ter 



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THE RESCUE— -condudaL 




for I'd! — But ere the word is giv*n,The helm is gone! the shroud's on fire! The mast in splinters riven ! One burst of anguish, long and deep, One cry of 



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keen de- spair, From hearts that fa - tal hour had taught Their on - ly hope was pray'r. 6. A light, a voice from yon-der tow'r Comes 1 



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sweeping o'er the wave; Cling to the spars, there's help at hand 1 The life-boat, the life-boat comes to save 1 The life-boat, the life-boat comes to save ! 




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4,7 On, sin-ner, on the voyage of life Thy bark awhile may glide, As tran-quil as that no-ble ship, A-long the ocean's tide. 7. But far from 




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God, what canst thou hope? Or where for refuge fly, When o'er thy frail and shatter'd bark The storm is raging high, The storm is raging high? 




Close with the tune Naoml 



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Oh give thy heart to Je-sus now, Whose pre-cious word is giv*n ; The Life-boat and the Lamp di -vine, To guide thy soul to heav'n ! 

ftf j i < p^ | f i I t TT3Jl"--" — -* , *'T - — ■ — ■ — — *— t ^ — ^ * - * T I TtTTTTI TTTTT^r ^^l rlTTTTTT • - — " 3ff 

Arrmn&dfrom * MUSICAL LEAVES? fy /trmMm. 

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view? You are fresh from the home of your boy - hood, 



And just in the bloom of youth ! . 

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WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO?— concluded. 



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tast - ed the spark - ling wa - ter . 



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what are you go-ing to do. 



bro-ther? Say, what are you go-ing to do? 






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Oh, what are you going to do, brother? 

The morning of youth is past ; 
The vigour and strength of manhood, 

My brother, are yours at last ; 
You are rising in worldly prospects. 
And prospered in worldly things ; 
A duty to those less favoured, 
The smile of your fortune brings. 
Chorus. — Go, prove that your heart is grateful— 
The Lord has a work for you 1 
Then what are you going to do, brother ? 
Say, what are you going to do ? 



Oh, what are you going to do, brother? 

Your sun at its noon is high ; 
It shines in meridian splendour, 

And rides through a cloudless sky. 
You are holding a high position, 
Of honour, of trust, and fame ; 
Are you willing to give the glory 
And praise to your Saviour's name ? 
Chorus. — The regions that sit in darkness 

Are stretching their hands to you ; 
Oh, what are you going to do, brother ? 
Say, what are you going to do ? 




Oh, what are you going to do, brother ? 

The tempter is near at hand : 
Look not on the wine that sparkles, 

Remember the great command. 
Go not to the midnight revel, 

Nor join in the careless song ; 
Beware of the wine that sparkles, 
'Twill lead thee to ruin and wrong. 
Chorus.— The eyes of the angels in pity 

Are mournfully turning to you ; 
Then what are you going to do, brother ) 
Say, what are you going to do ? 



Oh, what are you going to do, brother? 

The twilight approaches now ;— 
Already your locks are silvered, 
And winter is on your brow. 
Your talents, your tune, your riches, 

To Jesus, your Master, give ; 
Then ask if the world around you 
Is better because vou live. 
Chorus. — You are neanng the brink of Jordan, 
But still there is work for you ; 
Then what are you going to do, brother ? 
Say, what are you going to do ? 






Arrmngedfrom "MUSICAL LEAVES* AND " AMERICAN SACRED SONGSTER," h Jfrmistw*. 



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tern - pest, loud and wild. 



fear op - press'd my soul, That I might be too late;. 



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Oh! I trem-bled sore, And pray'd out - side the gate, 



And pray'd out - side the gate.. 



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"Mercy!" I loudly cried ; 

" Oh, give me rest from sin 1 " 
" I will," a voice replied ; 

And Mercy let me in. 
She bound my bleeding wounds 

And carried all my sin ; 
She eased my burdened soul, 

And Jesus let me in. 



In Mercy's guise I knew 

The Saviour long abused ; 
Who often sought my heart, 

And wept when I refused. 
Oh what a blest return 

For ignorance and sin 1 
I stood outside the gate, 

And Jesus let me in.— Josephine Po'lard, 



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Arrungtdfrem " AMERICAN SACRED SONGSTER" AND "HALLOWED SONGS," by fermutia*. 





LEAD, KINDLY LIGHT. 

*m THE DAYTIME ALSO HI LSD THKK WITH A OLOUD, AVD ALL THE MIGHT WITH A LIGHT OF FIBE." 




Wm H. Monk. 



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1. Lead, kind -ly Light, a - mid the en - circling gloom. Lead thou me on ; The night is dark, and I am far from 



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home; Lead thou me on.... Keep thou my feet; I do not ask to 

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I was not ever thus, nor prayed that thou 

Shonldst lead me on ; 
I loTed to ehoose and see my path ; but now 

Lead thon me on. 
I loved the garish day, and, spite of fears, 
Pride ruled my will : remember not past yean. 



8o long thy power hath blest me, sure it still 

Will lead me on 
O'er moor and fen, o'er crag and torrent, till 

The night is gone, 
And with the morn those angel faces smile 
Which I have loved long since, and lost awhile. 



*:« 



Combine all the sweetest strains of "When the morning stars 
sang together" — The Service of Song in Solomon's Temple, The Sweetest 
Note King David ever sounded from his Harp, — and we have only a 
befitting prelude to the Song of "MOSES AND THE LAMB." 



► * 



Jflf 1 t t t t t t l » i t i T i f T T— T— — — t^T-^ T T ■** *f— T 1 T f t t-t **t** t f t f H i i p it> ttP 1* ■!> '!> <T» H i i1 > if i» f T t W r-T~ttr~tT—1r-tt*~tfr*t*^**SHt*4> 

65 
Arranged /torn *80W9 UttT by permiuion. 




"I- tiJfaT J 



45 



4^4 





The way is long, my Father ! | and my soul 
Longs for the rest and quiet | of the | goal ; | 
While yet I journey through this weary land* 
Keep me from wandering. Father, | take my | hand, 

And in the way to endless day, 
Endless day, endless day, 

Lead safely on Thy child. 



The path is rough, my Father ! I Many a thorn 
Has pierced me ; and my feet, all torn 
And bleeding, J mark the J way. I Yet Thy command 
Bids me press forward. Father, | take my | hand ; 

Then safe and blest, O lead to rest, 
Lead to rest, lead to rest, 

O lead to rest Thy child. 



The cross is heavy, Father ! 1 1 hare borne 
It long, and | still do | bear it. 5 Let my worn 
And fainting spirit rise to that bright land 
Where crowns are given. Father, j take my | 

And, reaching down, lead to the crown, 
To the crown, to the crown, 

Lead to the crown Thy child. 



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The day goes fast, my child, but is the night 
Darker to me than day ? In me is light ; 
Keep close to me, and every spectral band 
Of fears shall vanish ; I will take thy hand, 

And through the night Lead up to light, my child. 

3- 
The way is long, my child, but it shall be 
Not one step longer than is best for thee ; 
And thou shalt know at last, when thou shalt stand 
Safe at the goal, how I did take thy hand, 
And lead thee straight To heaven's gate, my child. 

4- 
The path is rough, my child, but, oh ! how sweet 
Will be the rest for weary pilgrims' feet, 



When thou shalt reach the borders of that land 
To which I lead thee, as I take thy hand, 

And safe and blest With me shall rest, my child. 

5- 

The throng is great, my child, but at thy side 
Thy Father walks ; then be not terrified. 
For I am with thee — will thy foes command 
To let thee pass. But I will take thy hand, 

And through the throng Lead safe along, my child. 

6. 

The cross is heavy, child, yet there was One 
Who bore a heavier cross for thee — my Son, 
My well-beloved. For Him bear thine, and stand 
With Him at last ; and from thy Father's hand, 
Thy cross laid down, Receive thy crown, my child. 



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Arranged from "SONG LIFE AND SINGING ANNUAL? by Arrmit.n* 



1 ^ ^ ^ ^ .» « » » ^ »i 



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67 






"Almost persuaded," come, come to-day, 
44 Almost persuaded," turn not away ; 
Jesus invites you here, 
Angels are lingering near, 
Prayers rise from hearts so dear ; 
O wand'rer come 1 



"Almost persuaded," harvest is past ! 
"Almost persuaded," doom comes at last ! 

••Almost " cannot avail ; 

"Almost "is but to fail! 

Sad, sad, that bitter wail — 
"Almost but lost!'' 



Almost persuaded," tempt not this doom ; 
Almost persuaded," yet there is room; 

Now the new life begin, 

Mercy is more than sin, 

Jesus will lead thee in, 
Safe into heaven. 



68 Armnrr<ffir»m"THR CHARM* ANT> "SOA r n f rrr» h«J**r^**f~K 



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Accomp. 



Words and Music by Philip Phillips. 



z. Al - to - ge - ther per - suad • ed the Sa- viour to seek ; Al - to - ge - ther per - suad - ed to 

2. Al - to - ge - ther per - road - ed to trust in His word ; Al - to - ge - ther per • suad - ed, con - 

3. Al - to - ge - ther per - suad - ed a Chris- tian to be ; Al • to - ge - ther per - suad - ed my 
Slow and expressive. 



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strained by His love ; 

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Too long have I grieved Him, no com - fort have I* 

He bids me to come, And gain by His loss, 

Al - most is a foil - ure, with death it is rife, 

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Al - to - ge - ther per - 
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If I were a voice— a consoling voice, 

I'd fly on the wings of the air ; 
The homes of sorrow and guilt I'd seek, 
And calm and truthful words Fd speak 

To save them from despair. 
I would fly, I would fly o'er the crowded town, 
And drop, like the happy sunlight, down 
Into the hearts of suffering men, 
And teach them to look up again. 
I would fly, I would fly, &c* 
I would fly o'er the crowded town. 



If I were a voice— a convincing voice, 

I'd travel with the wind ; 
And where'er I saw the Nation's torn 
By warfare, jealousy, spite, or scorn, 

Or hatred of their kind— 
I would fly, I would fly on the thunder crash. 
And into their blinded bosoms flash, 
Then, with their evil thoughts subdued, 
Fd teach them Christian brotherhood. 
I would fly, I would fly, &c 
I would fly on the thunder crash* 







If I were a voice— an immortal voice, 

I would fly the earth around ; 
And wherever man to his idols bowed, 
Fd publish, in notes both long and loud, 

The Gospel's joyful sound. 
I would fly, I would fly on the wings of da£ 
Proclaiming peace on my world-wide way, 
Bidding the saddened earth rejoice. 
If I were a voice— an immortal voice, 

I would fly, I would fly, &c. 

I would fly on the wings of day. 



Arranged from "STANDADR GEMS.' and "SINGING PUGR1AT h Mnmistum. 



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71 



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Wards by Rev. W. Morley Punshon, D.D, 



Philip Phillips. 



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Seek those of evil behaviour, 

Bid them their lives to amend ; 
Go point the lost world to the Saviour, 

And be to the friendless a friend. 
Still be the lone heart of anguish 

Soothed by the pity of thine ; 
By waysides, if wounded ones languish* 

Go pour in the oil and the wine. 
Then work, &c. 



Work for the good that is nighest; 

Dream not of greatness afar; 
That glory is ever the highest, 

Which shines upon men as they are. 
Work, though the world would defeat you; 

Heed not its slander and scorn; 
Nor weary till angels shall greet you 

With smiles through the gates of the morn. 
Then work, &c* 




Work, though the enemies' laughter 

Over the valleys may sweep— 
For God's patient workers hereafter 

Shall laugh when the enemies weep* 
Ever on Jesus reliant, 

Press on your chivalrous way— 
The mightiest Philistine giant, 

His Davids are chartered to slay. 
Then work, &c 



Offer thy life on the altar, 

In the high purpose be strong j 
And if the tired spirit should fatter, 

Then sweeten thy labour with song; 
What, if the poor heart complained). 

Soon shall its wailing be o'eri 
For there, in the rest that remaineth. 

It shall grieve and be weary no more 
Then work, &r» 



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If you cannot on the ocean 

Sail among the swiftest fleet, 
Rocking on the highest billows, 

Laughing at the storms you meet ; 
You can stand among the sailors, 

Anchored yet within the bay ; 
You can lend a hand to help them 

As they launch their boat away. 



If you cannot in the harvest 

Gather up the richest sheaves, 
Many a grain both ripe and golden 

Will the careless reapers leave ; 
Go and glean among the briars, 

Growing rank against the wall, 
For it may be that their shadow 

Hides the heaviest wheat of all 



If you are too weak to journey 

Up the mountain, steep and high. 
You can stand within the valley 

While the multitudes go by ; 
You can chant in happy measures 

As they slowly pass along ; 
Though they may forget the singer, 

They will not forget the song. 



If you cannot in the conflict 

Prove yourself a soldier true, 
If, where fire and smoke are thickest, 

There's no work for you to do, 
When the battle-field is silent, 

You can go with careful tread ; 
You can bear away the wounded, 

You can cover up the dead. 



If you have not gold and silver 

Ever ready to command, 
If you cannot t'ward the needy 

Reach an ever open hand, 
You can visit the afflicted, 

O'er the erring you can weep; 
You can be a true disciple, 

Sitting at the Saviour's feet. 



Do not, then, stand idly waiting, 

For some greater work to do ; 
Fortune is a lazy goddess, 

She will never come to you. 
Go and toil in any vineyard, 

Do not fear to do or dare ; 
If you want a field of labor, 

You can find it anywhere. 






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At the Anniversary of the United States Christian Commission, held in the 
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was handed to the Chairman of the Meeting, Hon, Wm. H. Seward. 

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Beyond the blooming and the fading 

1 shall be soon ; 
Beyond the shining and the shading, 
Beyond the hoping and the dreading; 
I shall be soon. 
Love, rest and home. 
Sweet, sweet home, 
What bliss it will be there to meet 
The dear ones all at home. 



Beyond the rising and the setting 

I shall be soon ; 
Beyond the calming and the fretting* 
Beyond rememb'ring and forgetting, 
1 shall be soon. 
Love, rest, and home, 
Sweet, sweei home. 
What bliss it will be there to meet 
The dear ones all at home. 



Beyond the parting and the meeting 

I shall be soon ; 
Beyond the farewell and the jpreeting> 
Beyond the pulse's fever beatmg, 
I shall be soon. 
Love, rest, and home, 
Sweet, sweet home. 
What bliss it will be there to meet 
The dear ones all at home. 



Beyond the frost -chain and the fever 

I shall be soon ; 
Beyond the rock waste and the river, 
Beyond the ever and the never, 
1 shall be soon. 
Love, rest, and home, 
Sweet, sweet home, 
What bliss it will be there to meet 
The dear ones all at home. 



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I taw a gentle mother weep, 

As to her throbbing heart she pressed 

An infant, seemingly asleep 

On its kind mother's sheltering breast. 

" Fair one/' said I, " pray weep no more." 

Sobbed she, " The idol of my hope 

I now am called to render up ; 

My babe has reached death's gloomy shore." 

" Young mother, yield no more to grief, 

Nor be by passion's tempest driven, 

But find in these sweet words relief, 

There are no tears, no tears in heaven. ' 



I saw a man in life's gay noon, 
Stand weeping o'er his young bride's bier ; 
44 And must we part," he cried, " so soon 1 " 
As down his cheek there rolled a tear. 
14 Heart-stricken one," said I, " weep not ! " 
44 Weep not 1 " in accent wild he cried, 
44 But yesterday my loved one died, 
And shall she be so soon forgot ? " 
44 Forgotten ? no 1 still let her love 
Sustain thy heart, with anguish riven ; 
Strive thou to meet thy bnde above, 
And dry your tears, your tears in heaven." 




Poor traveller o'er life's troubled wave — 
Cast down by grief, o'erwhelmed by care- 
There is an arm above can save, 
Then yield not thou to fell despair. 
Look upward, mourners, look above I 
What though the .thunders echo loud, 
The sun shines bright beyond the cloud. 
Then trust to thy Redeemer's love, 
Where'er thy lot in life be cast ; 
Whate'er of toil or woe be given, 
Be firm ; remember to the last, 
" There are no tears, no tears in heaven." 





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t afrall ^leet attir |fcsi 



Rev. Dr. H. Bonar. 




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Philip Phillips.* 




i. Where the fa-ded flow*r shall freshen — Freshen ne - ver more to fade ; Where the sha-ded sky shall brighten — Brighten ne • ver-more to 




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shade; Where the son-blaze ne-ver scorch -es; Where the. star-beams cease to chill ; Where no tern - pest stirs the e-choes Of the 



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Where no shadow shall bewilder ; 

Where life's Tain parade is o'er ; 
Where the sleep of sin is broken, 

And the dreamer dreams no more ; 
Where the bond is never sever'd— 

Partings, claspings, sob and moon — 
Midnight waking, twilight weeping, 

Heavy noontide— all are done ; 
Where the child has found its mother ; 

Where the mother finds the child ; 
Where dear families are gatherM, 

That were scatter'd on the wild : 
Brother, we shall meet and rest 
'Mid the holy and the blest ! 




• This* beautiful 



Where the hidden wound is healed : 

Where the blighted life reblooms ; 
Where the smitten heart the freshness 

Of its buoyant youth resumes ; 
Where the love that here we lavish 

On the withering leaves of time, 
Shall have fadeless flowers to fix on 

In an ever spring-bright clime ; 
Where we find the joy of loving, 

As we never loved before— 
Loving on, unchill'd, unhimler'd — 

Loving once and evermore : 

Brother, we shall meet and rest 
'Mid the holy and the blest 1 



Where a blasted world shall brighten 

Underneath a bluer sphere, 
And a softer, gentler sunshine 

Shed its healing splendour here ; 
Where earth's barren vales shall blossom, 

Putting on their robes of green, 
And a purer, fairer Eden 

Be where only wastes have been ; 
Where a King in kingly glory, 

Such as earth has never known, 
Shall assume the righteous sceptre, 

Claim and wear the holy crown : 
Brother, we shall meet and rest 
'Mid the holy and the blest ! 

to Mr. Phillips by the author. Dr. Bonab, while at his home in Edinburgh, Scotland. 



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When, where, and how shall I die? 
Will strangers attend me, or kindred be near, 
And voices that love me fall sweet on my ear ? 
Or shall I alone through the valley depart, 
With none to support me or comfort my heart ? 

When, where, and how shall I die? 
When o'er the dark river I pass from the shore, 
Go with me, dear Jesus, 
I ask for no more. 



When, where, and how shall I die ? 
By illness protracted, or hasty decline ? 
Will pain, or a tranquil departure, be mine ? 
Will reason forsake me or conscience be clear, 
Will hope or its angel of mercy be near ? 

When, where, and how shall I die ? 
Oh, grant I may pillow my head on Thy breast, 
Thou Guide of the faithful, 
And God of the blest. 



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When, where, and how shall I die ? 
Though solemn the auestion, the time or the place 
Twill matter but little, if God, by His grace, 
Will help me to labour, to watch, and to pray, 
And wait for His coming : I know not the day 

When, where, and how I shall die. 
One blessing I crave, 'tis the greatest of all — 
Prepare me for death 
Ere Thy summons shall call. 



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Cling to the loving One, Cling in thy woe ; 
Cling to the living One, Through all below ; 
Cling to the pardoning One, He speaketh peace ; 
Cling to the healing One, Anguish shall cease. 



Cling to the bleeding One, Cling to His side ; 
Cling to the risen One, In Him abide 
Cling to the coming One, Hope shall arise ; 
Cling to the reigning One, Joy lights thine eyes. 

From " The America* Sacrtd Songster." 



THE CHRISTIAN'S MISSION. 



"LIFT UP YOUR BYBS UPOM THS PIBLDS." 



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Written by T. C. O'Kanb for Mr. Phillips. 




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B - ven joy and life e - ter - nal In the king- dom of your Lord, In the king- dom of your Lord. 
And that in his soul's sal - va - tion You may bear some hum -ble part, You may bear some hum - ble part. 

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Brother, you may •* sing for Jesus," 

Oh, how precious is His love t 
Praise Him for His boundless blessings 

Ever coming from above. 
Sing how Jesus died to save you, 

How your sin and guilt He bore ; 
How His blood hath sealed your pardon ; 

" Sing for Jesus " evermore. 




Brother, you may live for Jesus, 

Him who died that you might live I 
Oh, then all your ransomed powers 

Cheerful to His service give, 
Thus for Jesus you may labour, 

And for Jesus sing and pray ; 
Consecrate your life to Jesus ; 

Love and serve Him every day. 

From " New Hallowed Song* " 



79 



Digitized by V^jOOQLC 





T. C. O. Kaks. 



As I wan - der'd round the homestead, Many a dear fa - mil - iar spot, Brought with - in my re - col - lection, Scenes I'd 



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buck-et, Sent a thrill no tongue can tell. Hush, my dear, lie still and slum-ber, Ho - ly an - gels guard thy bed. 






Though the house was held by strangers. 

All remained the same within. 
Just as when a child I rambled 

Up and down, and out and in. 
To the garret dark ascending 

(Once a source of childish dread), 
Peering through the misty cobwebs, 

Lo II saw my cradle-bed. 

Quick I drew it from the rubbish, 

CoverM o'er with dust so long ; 
When, behold, I heard in fancy 

Strains of one familiar song. 
Often sung by my dear mother, 

To me in that cradle-bed. 
•" Hush, my dear, lie still and slumber, 

Holy angels guard thy bed." 




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While I listen to the music 

Stealing on in gentle strain, 
I am carried back to childhood — 

I am now a child again ; 
lis the hour for my retiring, 

At the dusky eventide ; 
Near my cradle -bed I'm kneeling, 

As in yore, by mother's side. 

Hands are on my head so loving. 

As they were in childhood's days ; 
I, with weary tones, am trying 
To repeat the words she says. 
Tis a prayer tn language simple 
As a mother's lips can frame ; 
•" Father, Thou who art in heaven. 
Hallow' d ever be Thy name." 
* Use the ind ending for these two lints. 



Prayer is over— to my pillow 

With a good-night kiss I creep, 
Scarcely waking while I whisper, 

" Now I lay me down to sleep." 
Then my mother, o'er me bending, 

Prays in earnest words, but mud, 
*" Hear my prayer, O Heavenly Father, 

Bless, oh, bless my precious child." 

Yet I am but only dreaming, 

Ne'er I'll be a child again. 
Many years has that dear mother 

In the auiet graveyard lain. 
But her blessed angel-spirit 

Daily hovers o'er my head, 
CalKng me from earth to heaven, 

Even from my cradle-bed. 



Arranged from " DEW DROPS" AND "SONG LIFE, 




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Chorus. 



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thunder of waters,pro-claims to the world, Je - ho-vah is marching a • long. 



Then wake, let us stand with onr face to the right,And 




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tread 'neath our feet ev'ry wrong ; 



The king-doms of darkness are trembling with fear, Je 



ho-vah is marching a - 





If en of business, awake to the eigne of the timee ; 

Be true, and to other* be joet ; 
•foe your wealth to the Lord, for to Him it belong*, 

lie lent it to yon aa a trust. 

Ctono.— Then wake, let ne stand, Ac 

3. 

Let the women awake to the eigne of the times ; 

God calls yon— the cross nobly bear; 
Yon can light op the heart with the pages of life, 

And triumph with God through your prayer. 
Chorus.— Then wake, let ns stand, &c 



Let the young men awake to the eigne of the times ; 

God calls you, because ye are strong : 
You can work in the vineyard, with ardour and seaL 

For Him who b marching along 

Chorms.— Then wake, let us stand, Ac 

5. 

Careless sinner, awake to the signs of the timee; 

Give Jesus your heart while you may ; 
O be washed in His blood— He will make you lib child. 

And take your transgressions away. 

Chorus.— Then wake, let us stand, Ac. 



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MODEL CHURCH— concluded. 



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The sexton did not sit me down, 

Away back by the door ; 
He knew that I was old and deaf^ 

And saw that I was poor.^ 
He must have been a Christian man* 

He led me boldly through 
The long aisle of that crowded church, 

To find a pleasant pew. 



I wish you'd heard the singing, wife, 

It had the old-time ring ; 
The preacher said, with trumpet voice, 

Let all the people sing : 
M Old Coronation " was the tune, 

The music upward rolled 
Till I thought I heard the angel-choir 

Strike all their harps of gold. 



My deafness seemed to melt away, 
My spirit caught the fire ; 

I joined my feeble, trembling voice, 
With that melodious choir ; 

And sang, as in my youthful days, 
41 Let angels prostrate fall ; 



I tell you, wife, it did me good 

To sing that hymn once more; 
I felt like some wrecked mariner 

Who gets a glimpse of shore. 
I almost want to lay aside 

This weather-beaten form, 
And anchor in the blessed port, 

For ever from the storm. 




Bring forth the roy-al di-a-dem, 



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And crown him Lord of aJL" 




Twas not a flowery sermon, wife, 

But simple gospel truth ; 
It fitted humble men like me ; 

It suited hopeful youth. 
To win immortal souls to Christ, 

The earnest preacher tried ; 
He talked not of himself or creed, 

But Jesus crucified. 



Dear wife, the toil will soon be o'er, 

The victory soon be won ; 
The shining land is just ahead, 

Our race is nearly run. 
We're nearing Canaan's happy shore, 

Our home is bright and fair : 
Thank God we'll never sin again ; 



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There'll be no sor - rdw there ; 

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AN OLD MAN IN A STYLISH CHURCH. 

(Tune— " Model Church.") 



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' Well, wife, I've been to church, to-day ; 

It was a stylish one ; 
And since you cannot go from home, 

I'll tell you what was done. 
You would have been surprised to see 

The things I saw to-day ; 
The sisters all were dressed so fine, 

They hardly knelt to pray. 



My clothes were coarse, and so they knew 

At once that I was poor; 
They led the old man to a seat, 

Uncushioned, by the door. 
A stranger came, a man of wealth, 

In costly robes arrayed ; 
Gold rings he wore, and room for him 

Was near the altar made. 



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I could not help but think it wrong 

That he should sit so near ; 
For he was young, and I was old, 

And very hard to hear. 
But then I thought, in yonder world, 

So pure and free from sin, 
How riches at the gate would beg, 

While poverty goes in. 



Too far to catch the preacher's voice, 

I prayed for those about ; 
That God would make them pure within, 

As they were clean without. 
'Tis true, I'm old and childish now ; 

But then I love to see 
A Christian wear the simple garb 

Of meek humility. 



Oh, why should man look down on man ? 

How many a noble breast 
May wake sweet music, though it throb 

Beneath a faded vest. 
Our Saviour loved and blessed the poor ; 

And when to Him we rise, 
The rich and poor will share alike 

His temple in the skies. 

John H. Yates 



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8pi-rit's sweet pleadings and strivings are . . o'er; The Lord of the vine- yard Stands wait-ing no more. 



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Sixth and Ninth hours. 



O Loiterer, speed thee, the morn wears apace ; 
Then squander no longer the moments of grace ; 
But haste while there's time, with thy master agree, 
The Lord of the. Vineyard stands waiting for thee. 

Gentle Spirit, stay, oh stay ; 

Brightly oeams the early day ! 

Let me linger in these bowers, 

God shall have my noontide hours: 

Chide me not for my delay ; 

Gentle Spirit, wait, I pray. 



Eleventh and last hours. 



O Sinner, arouse thee, the morning is past, 
Already the shadows are lengthening fast ; 
Escape for thy life, from the dark mountains flee, 
The Lord of the Vineyard is waiting for thee. 

Spirit, cease thy mournful lay ; 

Leave me to myself, I pray. 

Earth hath flung her spell around me ; 

Pleasure's silken chain hath bound me. 

When the sun his path hath trod, 

Spirit, then I'll turn to God 1 Knell. 



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Here, safe on the shore, I am wfit-ing for thee." 



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I AM WAITING FOR THEE— concluded. 




I remember that voice, as it led our lone way, 
'Midst rocks and through breakers and high-dashing spray ; 
How sweet to my heart did it sound from the shore, 
As it echoed so clearly o'er the dark billows' roar: 
2nd Vote*. — " Come this way, my father ; steer straight for me ; 
Here, safe on the shore, I am waiting for thee." 



That voice is now hushed, which then guided my way ; 
The form I then pressed is now mingling with clay ; 
But the tones of my child still sound in my ear, 
2nd Voice. — '• I am calling you, father, oh I can you not hear 

The voice of your darling, as you toss on life's sea ? 
For on a bright shore I am waiting for thee." 



I remember that voice in many a lone hour ; 
It speaks to my heart in fresh beauty and power, 
And still echoes far out o'er life's troubled wave, 
And sounds from the loved lips that lie in the grave : 
2nd Vou$.—" Come this wav, my father; oh 1 steer straight for me I 
Here, safely in heaven, I am waiting for thee." 



STONE OF BEAUTY. 



•'A NEW 6T0NH WHICH NO MAN XNOWETH SAVING HB THAT RBOBIVBTH IT." 



Philip Phillips. 



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1. He hath giv'n me a gem, as a to - ken so rare, In my 

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eve - uing'e re - pose, How sweet is the so - lace. When left all a-lone, Which is mioe when I gaze on my bean - ti-ful stone. 

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4. And this blest bond of un-ion lis 



bears my new name. Which no one can read, tho' to me 'tis so plain, And I 
promised the same To all who will love, and be - licve on his name. Ah ! 



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bet- ter land; Thou call edst its chil - dren a bap - py hand; Dear teach- er, where is that r» diant shore? Oh, 

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may we not seek it and weep no. more? la it where the flow 1 r of the o-ranpe blows. And the fire-flica glance thro* the 
diamonds it- lu-mine Us Be - cret mine. Docs the pearl gleam forth from its co - ral strand ? Is it there, dear teacher, that 

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THE MASTER IS WAITING. 

41 LOOK OH THB FIELDS, THBT AM WHITB ALREADY TO HAITBtT." 



Philip Phillips. 



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i. My sis - ter, the Mas - ter is call 
a. He waits where His chil - drcn are cry 

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you, Oh, hear His sweet voice and o - bey; 
bread, Where the tempt- ed are rea - dy to fall : 

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ish," He said, " I come with sal - va - tion for all." 



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"I would nor that a - ny should pe • 

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The Mas -ter is wait -ing, wait -rag* 

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The Mas -ter is wait -ing and call 

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My sister, the Master is waiting for you ; 

He calls for the reapers to-day. 
There's work for each one of His children to do; 

Oh 1 haste thee, no longer delay .—Chorus. 

Mrs. Anmib Wittbnmbybk 



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He waits in the homes of the poor and oppressed, 
To lighten the burdens they bear ; 

And brings to the weary and fainting ones rest- 
Go quickly, and meet with Him there.— Chants. 



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MY REDEEMER LIVES. 

• Nl I SHOW THAT MT UDIBMM UVSTB." 



S/<?w and full. 



Philip Phillips. 



i. I know that my Re • deem • er . . lives. What joy 



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He live*, to bless me with Hie love ; 
He lives, to plead for me above ; 
He lives, my hungry soul to feed ; 
He lives, to help in time of need. 



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He lives, and giants me daily breath ; 
He lives, and I shall conquer death ; 
He lives, my mansion to prepare ; 
He lives, to bring me safely there. 



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He lives, all glory to His Name ; 
He lives, my Saviour, still the same ; 
What joy the blest assurance gives — 
1 know that my Redeemer lives. 

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calli me. Lord, to Thee; For cleans-ing in thy precious blood That flow'd on Cal-va • ry. 



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Wash me.cleanse me in the Blood That flow'd on Cal-va - ry 1 

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*Tis Jesus calls me on 

To perfect faith and love ; 
To perfect hope, and peace, and trust, 

For earth and heaven above. 

Chorus. 

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'Tis Jesus who confirms 

The blessed work within, 
By adding grace to welcomed grace, 

Where reigned the power of sin. 

Chorus. 

[From " New Hallowed Songs," by permission.'] 



All hail 1 atoning blood ! 

All hail 1 redeeming grace 1 
All hail 1 the gift of Christ, our Lord, 

Our strength and righteousness I 

Choru. 



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glow, I wo r shipped, on her cheek; Yet with her stay my iky had paled, A let - ler cv - *ry 




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2 All hallowed by her tears and prayers, 
She left the babe — it lessened cares ; 
And when he calmly slept, 1 knew 
My dove would slumber sweetly too ; 
And so I wrote her now and then, 

•* The baby slept all night again ." 

3 One morn he languished at my side. 
Death- sick, and with the day he died ; 
I kept my sorrows, tears, my will t 
That she I loved be happy still ; 

So wrote I in my wonted strain, 
'* The baby slept all night again." 

4 But when, in turn, she fondly wrote, 
Her pet names using in her note, 
With artless talk about the bed 

Of him who slept so cold and dead ; 

I sat the bitter truth to pen, 

" He sleeps to wake no more again.*' 

5 When sobbing on my breast she lay, 
And sobbed her precious bloom away, 
And grief met ^rief, while of the dead 
We thought, within his narrow bed, 

I said, and saw it ease her pain, 

" He wakes to sleep no more again." 



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M SHOUT, FOR TBI LORD HATH OIVBN YOU THK CITY * 



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x. I'm more than conq*ror thro* His blood, Je - sua saves me now ; I rest beneath the shield of God, Je- sus saves me now. 



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2 Before the battle-lines are spread, 

Jesus saves me now ; 
Before the boasting foe is dead, 

Jesus saves me now. 
I win the fight, though not begun, 
1*11 trust and sing, still marching on, 

Jesus saves me now. 

3 I'll ask no more that I may see, 

Jesus saves me now ; 
His promise is enough for me, 

Tesus saves me now. 
Though foes be strong and walls be high, 
Vll shout > He gives the victory, 

Jesus saves me now. 



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4 Why should I ask a sign from God, 

Jesus saves me now ; 
Can I not trust the precious blood, 

Jesus saves me now. 
Strong in His Word % I meet the foe, 
And, shouting, win without a blow, 

Jesus saves me now. 

5 Should Satan come like whelming waves, 

Jesus saves me now ; 
Ere trials crush, my Father saves, 

Jesus saves me now. 
He hides me till the storm is past, 
For me He tempers every blast, 

Jesus saves me now. 

Rev. John Parker. 



$f>e Voitt of fcest. 

• COMB UNTO MB, ALL VB THAT LABOUR AMD ABB HBAVT LADBH, AHD I WILL OIVB YOU BBST.t 

Foster. 



Philip Phillips. 



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Je • sus say, "Come un 



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z. I heard the voice of Je - sus say, "Come un - to Me and rest; 
Lay down, poor wea - ry one, lay down Thy head up - on My breast. 

JO* J- 



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I heard the voice of Jesus say, 

•• Behold, I freely give 
The living water, thirsty one, 

Stoop down, and drink, and live ; " 
I came to Jesus, and I drank 

Of that life-giving stream ; 
My thirst was quenched, my soul revived, 

And now I live in Him. 




3 I heard the voice of Jesus say, 

"lam this dark world's light ; 
Look unto Me, thy morn shall rise, 

And all thy day be bright.*' 
I looked to Jesus, and I found 

In Him my radiant Sun ; 
So in the Light of light I live, 

And glory is begun I Dr. H. Bonar. 



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That unchangeable home is for you and for me, 

Where Jesus of Nazareth stands. 
The Kin? of all kingdoms for ever is He, 

And He holdeth our crowns in His hands. 



Oh that home of the soul, in my visions and dreams, 

Its bright jasper walls I can see, 
Till I fancy but thinly the vale intervenes 

Between the fair city and me. 

3- " 5. 

There the great tree of life in its beauty doth grow, Oh how sweet it will be in that beautiful land, 

And the river of life floweth by, So free from all sorrow and pain ! 

For no death ever enters that city, you know, With songs on our lips, and with harps in our hands, 

And nothing that maketh a lie. To meet one another again 

" Now I saw in my Dream that these two men went in at the Gate ; and lo, as they entered, they were transfigured, and they had Raiment pat upon them that shone like 
Gold. There was also that met them with Harps and Crowns, and gave to them, the Harps to praise withal, and the Crowns in token of honour. Then I heard in my Dream 
that all the Bells in the City rang again for ioy, and that it was said unto them, Enter ye into the joy of your Lord. Now just as the Gates were opened to let in the men, I 
looked in after them, and behold, the City shone like the Sun : the Streets also were paved with Gold, and in them walked many men, with Crowns on their heads, Palms 
in their hands, and Harps to sing praises withal. After that they shut up the Gates, which when I had seen I wished myself among them." 




—-*««*»«-»■«*—■■* — «*-t>'^— ■*> 



*^- 



Arranged f mm " SINGING P 'LGRIM" AND "SONG LIFE? by ficrmisswn.t 
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INDEX. 




Almost persuaded 

Beyond the smiling and the weeping ... 

Bless me now ... 

Centennial song 

Cling to the Mighty One 

Christian's mission 

Congregational chorus ... 

Conquering life 

Cradle-bed song 

Depart from Me 

Dying child 

Father, take my hand ... 

God knows it all 

Guard thy tongue 

He leads us on 

Home of the soul 

I am coming, Lord 

i am waiting for thee ... 

i cannot do without thee 

I'll tell them to be true ... ... 

I will sing for Jesus ... 

I will take thy hand ... 

Keep me from sinking ... 

Lead, kindly Light 

Leap for life ... 

Leaning on Thee 

Let us try to make life pleasant 

Loftiest note of praise 

My daily wants 

My Redeemer lives 

NO NIGHT SHALL BE IN HEAVEN ... 

Not ALMOST, BUT altogether persuaded ... 
No tears in Heaven 
One sweetly solemn thought ... 
Opening Exercises. — Praise the Lord our 

great Creator 
Our native land 
Outside the gate 



Paob 

68 
75 
*5 
SO 
79 
79 
«7 
94 
80 

38 
57 
C6 
22 

44 
53 
95 
92 
86 

9 
70 

39 
67 

21 

65 
29 

37 
16 
20 

36 
9i 

33 

69 
76 

34 

7 
26 

64 



Pilgrim on the road 

Pilgrim's mission 

Power of truth 

Praise the Lord, O my soul 

Praise the Lord, our great Creator 

Prodigal child, return ... 

Remembered by what I have done 

Renounce the cup 

Sacred song and chorus 

Scatter seeds of kindness 

Self-deceived ... 

Signs of the times 

Singing for Jesus 

Song of salvation 

Stone of Beauty. • . . ... 

Sweeping through the gates ... 

The better land 

The gate ajar for me ... 

The grand old story ... 

The guiding hand 

The Lord will provide ... 

The Master is waiting ... 

The model church 

The pardon 

The promise time to-morrow 

The rescue 

The stylish church 

The tongue 

This I did for thee 

Three warnings 

Voice of rest ... ... , ... 

Wakes, to sleep no more again... 
We'll meet and rest ... 
What are you going to do, brother? 
When, where, and how shall I die ? 
Words of song and universal praise 
Your mission ... 



Paob 

37 
72 
12 
90 
7 

28 

59 
58 
18 

23 
81 

52 
10 

87 

54 

88 

40 

8 

17 

5* 
89 

82 

47 
42 
60 

83 
+6 

35 
84 
94 
93 
77 
62 
78 

5 1 
74 



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